Archive for the 'Questioning Ebola’s Fever Criteria' Category

RENSE.COM: EBOLA vs African TB ― OR HOW TO HIDE A DIAGNOSIS BEHIND A FEVER

November 20, 2014

 Dr. Lawrence Broxmeyer, MD

 

The CDC has quietly lowered its “critical temperature” protocols for detecting a fever ‘characteristic’ for Ebola after one health care worker slid by with a low-grade fever ― yet tested Ebola positive ― So……
“We changed to 100.4 after the first nurse presented to hospital with symptoms of disease and her temp was not the 101.5 that Ebola patients usually present when they are having vomiting diarrhea, etcetera,” CDC spokesman Thomas Skinner told the Daily Caller.
Etcetera. Etcetera. What Skinner meant is their Ebola temperature criteria has been changed to a temperature of 100.4ºF or above.
Anyway 100.4° (or above) sounds like a nice round number. So let’s examine it.
On the National Health Service’s website, put up by the UK government, the now magically designated temperature of100.4ºF or above also appears ― but not for Ebola. They are describing temperatures characteristic for tuberculosis. (http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Tuberculosis/Pages/Symptoms.aspx)

And, it might be added, temperatures characteristic for a dozen-and-a-half other illnesses.
So much for the use of temperature as an Ebola criteria.

Subsequently, by October the 20th ― World Health Organization (WHO) claimed Nigeria, which used to have the highest ‘Ebola’ death rate of any country in the world (See: http://rense.com/general96/ebooraf.html – “Ebola-free” Great, but does that they can say the same about the Ebola-like symptoms originating from the African strains of tuberculosis ― namely Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium africanum ― still raging over there? Will they next proclaim West Africa “Tuberculosis-free?”

Extrapulmonary (outside of the lungs) tuberculosis is the most frequent cause of a prolonged Fever of Unknown Origin (FUO) and has been for a long, long time.1,2
And in patients returning from areas where tuberculosis and malaria are
Common ― such as Africa ― the index of suspicion for these diseases should be elevated.
The current question………………… is it?
REFERENCES:

1. Kasper DL, Braunwald E, Fauci AS, Hauser SL, Longo DL, Jameson JL, Casademont J. Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine. 16th Edition. 2004. McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing. 2680 pp
2. Roth AR, Basello GM. Approach to the adult patient with fever of unknown origin.Am Fam Physician. 2003 Dec 1;68(11):2223-8.

See also:

http://www.rense.com/general96/ebotbinter.html  Ebola & African TB – An Interview With Dr. Lawrence Broxmeyer, MD Part 1  Jeff Rense Dr. Lawrence Broxmeyer, MD 11-6-14
http://www.rense.com/general96/eboaf2.html
Ebola & African TB – An Interview With Dr. Lawrence Broxmeyer, MD Part 2
http://www.rense.com/general96/ebolareal.html
Is The Ebola Virus Real? From Dr. Lawrence Broxmeyer, M.D. © U.S. Library of Congress All rights reserved 11-9-14